Argus C3 Vintage Camera

Argus C3 with 50mm Cintar Lens

The Argus C3 was a rangefinder camera produced from 1939 to 1966 by Argus in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. The camera was the best-selling 35mm camera in the world for nearly 30 years and popularized the 35mm format. Due to its shape, size, and weight, it is commonly called "The Brick" by photographers. The most famous 20th century photographer who used it is Tony Vaccaro, who used this model during World War II. The C3 was constructed of Bakelite and metal . The design featured an unusual but simple diaphragm shutter built into the camera body, so the camera could make use of interchangeable lenses without the need for a complex focal plane shutter. The rangefinder was separate from the viewfinder and was coupled to the lens through a series of gears located on the outside of the camera body. The profusion of knobs, gears, buttons, levers, and dials on the camera lent it a "scientific" look that was found in customer surveys to be one of the things buyers most liked about the camera. This particular camera is in fair condition, the shutter fires but does not retract, there is a small piece missing from the body denoted in thew 3rd picture inside the white circle, the camera is priced accordingly. This antique Argus camera and included original leather case is used, sold as collectibles and sold as is.

Old Price: $49.95

Price: $44.55

You save: $5.40

Shipping: $14.95

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Argus C3 Vintage Camera

Argus C3 with 50mm Cintar Lens

The Argus C3 was a rangefinder camera produced from 1939 to 1966 by Argus in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. The camera was the best-selling 35mm camera in the world for nearly 30 years and popularized the 35mm format. Due to its shape, size, and weight, it is commonly called “The Brick” by photographers. The most famous 20th century photographer who used it is Tony Vaccaro, who used this model during World War II. The C3 was constructed of Bakelite and metal . The design featured an unusual but simple diaphragm shutter built into the camera body, so the camera could make use of interchangeable lenses without the need for a complex focal plane shutter. The rangefinder was separate from the viewfinder and was coupled to the lens through a series of gears located on the outside of the camera body. The profusion of knobs, gears, buttons, levers, and dials on the camera lent it a “scientific” look that was found in customer surveys to be one of the things buyers most liked about the camera. This particular camera is in fair condition, the shutter fires but does not retract, there is a small piece missing from the body denoted in thew 3rd picture inside the white circle, the camera is priced accordingly. This antique Argus camera and included original leather case is used, sold as collectibles and sold as is.